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Changing BIOS Dates


For installing Beta's you need to change the BIOS date to an specific time period otherwise it is not usable.
But it is not always as easy as entering the BIOS, so that is where the following instructions are for.

Microsoft Virtual PC

Changing the BIOS Date in Virtual PC is not as easy as just chancing the date and saving.
Microsoft Virtual PC resets the date by every boot of the VM to the current PC Time, you can get around it with adding some easy code into the .VMC (Virtual Machine Configuration File) file.

Type the text into the .VMC File:

You should always type the text given here into the .VMC File, otherwise it will either fail to start the VM with a wrong .VMC File or the BIOS Time will not saved.
For some people it works by copying and for some it doesn't, I only give this warning to say that if you copy it, and it fails, you need to type it in there.

Type the following in your .VMC Configuration File.

         <components>
               <host_time_sync>
                     <enabled type="boolean">false</enabled>
               </host_time_sync>
         </components>

In the following section, just before the closing tags:

               </microsoft>
         </integration>

Now just start the VM and go into the BIOS with DEL and then set the date and save it, now the date is saved.

Virtual PC Toolkit:
Instead of chancing the .VMC file manually, you can use the tool that is made and provided by DeFacto/Overdoze.
It's only requirements are that you have Microsoft .NET Framework 4 Client Profile installed.
.NET Framework 4 Client Profile is automatically installed via Windows Update or you can install it manually on:
Windows XP SP3, Windows Server 2003 SP2, Windows Vista SP1 and higher (included in Windows 8 and higher).
Download the VPC Toolkit here.


VMWare Workstation / Player

In VMWare to change the date, just change it and save it.
But when you install the VMWare Tools later on it will sync to your current computer time.

Type the text into the .VMX File
You should always type the text given here into the .VMX File, otherwise it will either fail to start the VM with a wrong .VMX File or the BIOS Time will not saved.
For some people it works by copying and for some it doesn't, I only give this warning to say that if you copy it, and it fails, you need to type it in there.
To prevent that VMWare sync the set time to your current PC time, type the following into the .VMX file.

         tools.syncTime = "FALSE" This line could be already present in the file, if it is, the VM will not boot.
         time.synchronize.continue = "FALSE"
         time.synchronize.restore = "FALSE"
         time.synchronize.resume.disk = "FALSE"
         time.synchronize.shrink = "FALSE"

VMWare still moves the time forwards in real time if you have shutdown the VM, but not the date (it will only move the date, if it is past midnight on the VM).

Oracle VirtualBox


Step 1: Open the Calculator.
Step 2: Calculate how many days it is between the current date and the date of your needed BIOS Date.
Step 2a: For Windows 7, you can use the advanced calculator to calculate the amount of days.
Step 3: Use the following to calculate the miliseconds needed: (number of days) * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000 = the answer you get is the time in miliseconds
Step 4: Go in the command prompt to folder where you installed Virtualbox, Default for both x86 & x64 is C:\Program Files\Sun\VirtualBox or substitute Sun for Oracle if you installed Oracle Virtualbox.
Step 5: Use VBoxManage to modify the VM with the following command: VBoxManage modifyvm (name of VM in the list) -biossystemtimeoffset --(milliseconds, the outcome of the calculation)
Step 6: Exit the command prompt and then start the VM and install your Windows Build.

Oracle VirtualBox 4.0:
Oracle VirtualBox 4.0 has a problem with Microsoft Windows Codename "Longhorn" builds, use Oracle VirtualBox 4.1 and higher.